Book Display

Portfolio Management Formulas Mathematical Trading Methods for the Futures, Options, and Stock Markets
ISBN: 0471527564     Date Published: 1990-10-19     Author(s): Ralph Vince
  Average Customer Rating:Stars Rating  
 

Your Price: $92.77      Retail: $120.00      Save: $27.23      Benifit - 23% Off  
$92.77
Book Image
Hardcover
Wiley
288 Pages
 
Prices subject to change.
Last Update:
06/20/2013 01:28:45
Buy Book
Return to Book Index  
Editorial Review - Book Description:
Explores two neglected mathematical tools essential for competing successfully in today`s frenzied commodities markets: quantity, which shows the proper amounts a trader should trade for a given market and system, and intercorrelation of returns (diversification), which shows not only which markets and systems to trade, but how to diversify with respect to trading the right quantities for each market. By using these lesser known tools in conjunction with the more popular trade/system selection tools, readers will see mathematically how success in the markets can be achieved, and how ``success`` without using all three is most likely incidental. In addition, non-stationary distribution of profits and losses and drawdowns are incorporated into the discussions to expose traders to the highs and lows of commodities markets and how best to leverage their assets.
 
Customer Review:
Total Reviews: (6)
  (4)      (0)      (0)      (1)      (1)
(3) Shared
 
28 of 31 People found the following review helpful.

Excellent coverage of a difficult topic, November 19, 2000 ByJohn Fairbanks "John Fairbanks" (Houston, TX USA) - See all my reviews Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?) This review is from: Portfolio Management Formulas : Mathematical Trading Methods for the Futures, Options, and Stock Markets (Hardcover) ... this book is incredible. I have a degree in mathematics and the principles expressed are extremely sound -- but far more important than the formulas are the first couple of chapters which cause you to view trading in a very different, and statistical, manner. Although the theories in this book can really only be applied to a trading system (which I haven't really used), after reading this book over several times I understand that there is a mathematical certainty that I will eventually lose my trading capital if I don't start approaching trading in a more systematic fashion. Anyway, I highly recommend it -- the sections on gambling theory alone are worth buying it.
 
30 of 36 People found the following review helpful.

Beware applying optimal f to actual trading, March 1, 2000 By A Customer This review is from: Portfolio Management Formulas : Mathematical Trading Methods for the Futures, Options, and Stock Markets (Hardcover) The problem with optimal f is that the calculation is highly dependent on the largest loss on a trade (not drawdown) experienced in backtesting. If you use optimal f and the largest loss in actual trading is greater than the loss experienced in backtesting, you will go bankrupt. Vince deals with this problem in an offhanded manner by suggesting that the actual f you use should be "padded". OK, so in the end you don't even use the actual optimal f, you pad it. And how much do I pad it by? Vince is silent on this question. So the purpose of optimal f - to decide by formula how much capital to allocate to a trade - is totally negated by the fact that you must "pad" optimal f. And you must pad it by a qualitativly determined amount because, again, Vince gives no formula on how much to pad it by. Optimal f is totally useless for system traders or any other trader for that matter.
 
15 of 17 People found the following review helpful.

Top notch, August 2, 2005 ByPushin' Fifty (St Louis, MO) - See all my reviews This review is from: Portfolio Management Formulas : Mathematical Trading Methods for the Futures, Options, and Stock Markets (Hardcover) I found this book to be amazingly good. Equities traders should be forwarned that "Optimal f" is employed here for commodities traders that can make use of big margin, but Vince may have addressed this issue in his more recent books. It seems a quite a few people get angry or perplexed by optimal f, and the reasons boil down to a handful: Objection: Employing Optimal f will introduce you to levels of risk (large drawdowns) you find disagreeable. Response: That's OK, the mathematical reasoning is not invalidated by the extent to which one is risk averse. If you don't like using the largest historical loss to calculate Optimal f, you can use far larger datasets to produce more radical outliers, or even estimate catastrophic (percentage) losses. Objection: The whole scheme seems a little too radical. Response: This is the very thing that makes the book so refreshing. Vince has done his own thinking, and he has done quite a bit of thinking very carefully. I wish I...
 
Buy Book